Thursday, 18 September 2014

I READ ZINES [#4]


Hand Job Issue #6 'No Reward'

I love Hand Job Zine. It's a proper zine, made the way zines were meant to be made; cut and pasted and photocopied. Or at least aesthetically that's how it feels (Due to sheer volume I think they were professionally printed for this issue). On show inside the pages of this issue, as in every issue, are an array of talented British writers (including one Joseph Ridgwell whom I interviewed recently). I highly recommend this zine to any one that enjoys good, no nonsense literature and especially to fans of old school fanzines. Issue #6 is on the way (and features a short story by yours truly!)

EDIT: I have been reliably informed that thus far no professional printers have tainted the pages of Hand Job. I stand corrected.


PUSH #12 August/September 2014

PUSH is another British literary zine that actually came out in the same month (March 2013) as the first issue of my zine, Paper and Ink. One of us just released our third Issue and one of us is just about to released its thirteenth. The incredible work ethic of editor Joe England aside, PUSH is somewhat of a phenomenon. It is sold on the street outside football matches (that's soccer for you Americans reading this) and has shifted a whopping 1500 copies since it came out. The content is definitely geared towards its target clientèle, with poems about prostitutes and stories about football and armed robbery, but it works. This particular issue also features a great, in-depth interview with writer John King (Human Punk, The Football Factory), which is worth the meagre cost of the magazine alone. PUSH #13 is out very soon! 


W/R/T/1 With Regard To Modernity

This is a brand new lit zine, edited by John Morrison. It contains eight short stories, from eight different writers, all on the theme of modern life. I like the very simple, no thrills, design of this zine and as for the stories, they're all well written pieces. My favourite was a compelling tale of drug induced psychosis by Terence Corless. The rest of the stories range from a lonely woman becoming obsessed with her doctor to a cyberpunk tale of a dystopian future where people are addicted to information. This zine is definitely worth checking out and I look forward to future issues.

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